Fast food in children’s hospitals a bad lesson

7 12 2006

A very interesting article worth reading…

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Fast food outlets are common inside U.S. children’s hospitals, leading more patients to consume hamburgers and fries and encouraging them to view the fare as healthier than it probably is, a study said on Monday.

Of 200 hospitals with pediatric residency programs surveyed, 59 had fast-food restaurants on site, said the report published in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

More than half the patients or family members visiting hospitals with fast food outlets said they ate fast food the day they were surveyed, which was four times the rate among people at hospitals without outlets, the survey of 386 people found.

McDonald’s, which does provide financial support to some of the hospitals surveyed and operates several homes for ill children, was the prevalent restaurant in hospitals studied.

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What Can Parents Do About Online Safety

3 12 2006

It should come as no surprise that parental involvement is the key to keeping kids safe online. You can lecture your kids, you can install filters to block objectionable websites, you can spy on your kids and you even can try tokeep your kid off the Internet, but none of those tactics are as effective as engaging them in conversation about what they’re doing online.

This is especially true in the “Web 2.0” era of the interactive Internet when kids are not only “downloading” inappropriate information but “uploading” information about themselves in social networking sites like MySpace and even video sites like YouTube. Today, parents have to worry not just what their kids “see” on the net but what they “say” as well.

So what does it mean to be an involved parent? It doesn’t necessarily mean standing over your kid’s shoulder every time he or she goes online, but it does mean talking with your kids – especially your teens – on a regular basis about their internet activities.

And don’t just focus on porn and predators. There are other “risks” for kids ranging from cyber bullying to net addiction to commercial exploitation. If your kids open up about bad experiences, don’t overreact or blame the victim. Listen carefully and appreciate that fact that they’re coming forward.

Your children may not want to talk about any negative experiences they’ve had online, but don’t let that stop you from talking with them about dangers on the Internet. Don’t exaggerate but do warn kids that getting giving out personal information and getting together with people they meet online can be dangerous. Let them know that the safest way to deal with unwanted solicitations is to not respond.

Don’t think that kids aren’t listening. Just as with messages about smoking and other dangerous substances, parents do have an impact. A national survey of teens conducted by the Boys and Girls Clubs found that “more than 1 in 3 youth (37%) stated that their relationship with their parents/guardians was most important to them… Surprisingly, nearly half (45%) of all respondents said that their parents most significantly influence their decisions, rather than their peers.”

Continue to read full article here





‘Tweens’ are fast becoming the new teens

26 11 2006

For all you that are parents of “tweens”, check out this article.

Zach Plante is close with his parents — he plays baseball with them and, on weekends, helps with work in the small vineyard they keep at their northern California home. Lately, though, his parents have begun to notice subtle changes in their son. Among other things, he’s announced that he wants to grow his hair longer — and sometimes greets his father with “Yo, Dad!”

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How Parents Can Choose the Proper Little League Coach for Their Child

22 11 2006

Another great article! Since I am a mom of an 8 year old boy who dreams of playing professional baseball when he’s older, I thought I would provide this link to a great article.

Before parents just sign their kids up for little league, they need to do some research on the coach. Little league could negatively or positively impact a son or daughter and most of the time the initial impact is made by the coach. Imagine your ten year old trying to stretch a single into a double and unfortunately they get thrown out. You would expect the child to receive encouragement from his coach for good hustle and aggressive behavior, but what if, they didn’t. What if, instead of congratulating the athlete for his or her efforts, the coach starts yelling and screaming at the ten year old for poor judgment. How can you as parents spot a good coach from a bad coach? Parents want their kids to have a great experience and learn that sports are meant to teach. So what are the characteristics in a coach that a parent should be looking for? Is it the team that always wins or the coach that plays everyone? Well, the real question should be: what coach will be best for my kid? Most professionals suggest that when looking for a coach you should look for one: that is going to be positive, that knows the limitations of little leaguers, that is going to educate their players about the game, that respects the athletes individuality and shows they care for them as a person, and one that will create an enjoyable experience for the kids.

Read more of this article here….





What is your parenting style?

24 10 2006

I was searching to find out what other types of parenting styles work for other parents and I can acroos a few articles that I thought that might interest you….Take a look and enjoy!

What is attachment parenting? The term, “attachment parenting”, was conceived by pediatrician William Sears and his wife Martha, to describe a highly responsive, attentive style of caring for a child. Attachment parenting promotes physical and emotional closeness between parent and child through what the Sears refer to as the “Baby Bs.” The Baby Bs are bonding, breastfeeding, babywearing, bedsharing and boundary building.

Read more of the article HERE

Four Parenting Styles

Indulgent parents (also referred to as “permissive” or “nondirective”) “are more responsive than they are demanding. They are nontraditional and lenient, do not require mature behavior, allow considerable self-regulation, and avoid confrontation” (Baumrind, 1991, p. 62). Indulgent parents may be further divided into two types: democratic parents, who, though lenient, are more conscientious, engaged, and committed to the child, and nondirective parents.

Authoritarian parents are highly demanding and directive, but not responsive. “They are obedience- and status-oriented, and expect their orders to be obeyed without explanation” (Baumrind, 1991, p. 62). These parents provide well-ordered and structured environments with clearly stated rules. Authoritarian parents can be divided into two types: nonauthoritarian-directive, who are directive, but not intrusive or autocratic in their use of power, and authoritarian-directive, who are highly intrusive.

Authoritative parents are both demanding and responsive. “They monitor and impart clear standards for their children’s conduct. They are assertive, but not intrusive and restrictive. Their disciplinary methods are supportive, rather than punitive. They want their children to be assertive as well as socially responsible, and self-regulated as well as cooperative” (Baumrind, 1991, p. 62).

Uninvolved parents are low in both responsiveness and demandingness. In extreme cases, this parenting style might encompass both rejecting–neglecting and neglectful parents, although most parents of this type fall within the normal range.

You can read the full article HERE





Separation Anxiety

23 10 2006


My daughter is 6 months old now and she is finally having separation anxiety. Mornings are hard because I have to nurse her, try to pump so she will have extra milk, get ready for work, and get my other child ready for school. All she wants is mommy and if she doesn’t have mommy she will cry. There has been a couple of days where I had to stay home from work or leave early from work due to her needing her mommy. Mind you, I worl 50 miles away so it’s not like I can be home in a few minutes. It takes me an hour without traffic.

So, what can I do is the question to let her know that mommy will be back and I am not leaving her forever? Daddy calms her down until my 14 year old daughter gets home from school and she seems to do well with my older daughter cause she is a girl and we look like twins….

If you are a parent of a young baby and are going through the same thing, I would like to hear what your techniques are….

Listed below is an article I found on
Separation Anxiety….





A little of “ME” time

20 09 2006

As a parent of 3 kids, I always seem to have no “ME” time. Does all parents go through this or am I the only one? It seems like I have no time during the day to be alone. I can never take a relaxing bubble bath or take a 2 hour nap or even have a day on the computer. The only time I have for myself is when I wake up at 4:30am everyday. I work three 10 hour days a week and still that is not “Me” time since I am with my co-workers. I get home around 8pm, feed my 5 month old her dinner and then put her to bed and I am usually passed out by 9 or 9:30pm.

My husband watches her on the days I work and then he works when I am off. Money is tight, my house is a mess and I am stressed out….There are baseball and softball games to attend but I cannot find the energy to clean my house. Luckily my 14 year old daughter does the dishes and such….All I want to do on my days off is relax, but there is no time to relax when I have a 5 month old starting to crawl and only naps in 15-30 minute spurts…I do love my life but I am just venting. Being a parent is rough at times but I would not change it for the world.

Where are all the moms like me? Would love to hear from you!!!